Thursday, July 14, 2011

Mind Over Matter?

I was a real estate agent for a year.

I love amiable pets but freeze with fear of unsociable ones, specifically dogs. When another real estate agent and I went to preview a house, I followed her as we made our tour through the house. We were about to pass through a doorway when she stopped, looked downward, and said “Hey, baby.”

I thought my friend was speaking to a toddler, but as I made my way into the room I encountered a white, long-haired, very mixed breed dog whose back was level with my hips. A big dog. I didn’t speak. Thankfully, the dog paid little attention to us tramping through his residence. As you read this you see that he left an impression on me.

Another house we were previewing had a loft area above the living room. Again I followed my friend. As we ascended the stairs and caught our first view of the loft area its floor was even with our heads. I heard what I thought was a bird. I certainly didn’t want a bird dive bombing into my head so I took a quick look around the room. I didn’t see a small bird in flight as I had expected; I did see a beautiful (if it had been in a cage) parrot-looking type of bird sitting on its perch with no barrier between it and me. And the bird was not tethered to the perch. As its beady eyes followed our movements, I backed down the stairs. No desire to tangle with a large, squawking bird.

Another experience with a dog went this way: I made an appointment by phone to show a home; as always I asked if there would be a dog on the premises. The other agent answered yes but assured me that a neighbor would have the dog confined at her house during my appointment. All went fine as my client, her small son, and I entered the house. However, when we left the house, I replaced the door key into the lock box hanging on the front door handle before turning toward my car.

Looming between me and my car was a large (are there any other sizes?) boxer-breed dog. Between me and my car. The dog didn’t take his eyes from us—we were coming out of his house. I didn’t even consider trying to walk past him to the car but wondered if I could get us back into the house before he came nearer. With trembling hands, I finally removed the key from the lock box and let us back into the house. I called the listing agent, she promised to make a call, and soon we saw a young man leading the boxer toward the house next door.

No need to explain to you why I was a real estate agent for only one year. Another instance of facing your fears. I couldn’t put mind over matter. I didn’t pass the test this time. If I ever own another dog it will be a small dog like Tammy Alexander’s Jack.


The Good Lord gave you a body that can stand most anything. It’s your mind you have to convince.”—Vince Lombardi, collegiate football coach



Till next time … keep on smiling.

2 comments:

  1. Jo, I wanted to invite you over, but I have an English Mastiff ... 190 pounds of woof. He's a sweetheart but his tail would bruise your hip as he wagged it.

    To be honest, I'm not so much wary as I'm respectful of all dogs, large or small. Just remember to never put your hand on top of their head until you're fast friends. That's a move of dominance to a dog and could get you in trouble. Once you're friends with the dog, though, you can pat its head. :)

    Somehow, though, I can't quite see you wanting to do that. ;) LOL

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  2. Ane, sounds as if you know me well. Would love to visit you and your English Mastiff. Maybe ... Someday ... Probably not ...

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